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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
with a former director of the cia and nsa general michael hayden, as well as nsa critic congressman justin amash of michigan. then washington keeps heading for a budget impasse and government shutdown. >> we've seen a certain faction of republicans in congress saying they wouldn't pay the very bills that congress racked up in the first place. >> you know, instead of working together, the president yesterday threatened to shut down the government. >> in an exclusive interview, we'll ask house majority leader eric cantor if they can make a deal before the deadline, all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again from fox news in washington. we begin with a terror threat that has prompted the state department to arab i global issl alert for americans, and close two dozen embassies and consulates across the muslim world. we're told the al-qaeda threat is specific, but the targets are not. chief washington correspondent james rosen has the latest. james? >> chris, good morning. president obama and his national security team approached this day, the president's 52nd birthday, not in a state of celebra
have posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very thatly about the nsa, and is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. doing himsa has been as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts onwhat they call metadata your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was thently disclosed, and problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection to a terrorist or not. they decided that they have the authority to gather up everyone's
there, chris lavoie, jim ward. before we -- lots of big news obviously, nsa, all of that stuff. however, more importantly, nancy in ohio says omg, thanks to listening to a steph cast, only $4.95 a month, and then taking a shower that sound of trying to get the last drops of shampoo out of my bottle will never sound the same. it sounds exactly like turtle sex. eh, eh. >> stephanie: you don't want to wait. just that last little -- i apologize for that. [ applause ] >> wow! >> stephanie: all right. >> she thought of this when she was in the shower. >> it sounded like someone else's faucet? >> stephanie: right. the guy didn't repair his faucet correctly. that's how it sounds when he needs water. all right. in the meantime, because we should just start monday, we should start the week with some weirdness. >> yeah? >> stephanie: rocky mountain mike for some reason has decided to combine turtle sex, dana loesch, cody the screaming dog and barry white. why not? >> because he can. ♪ >> stephanie: that's weird. [dana loesch screaming] >> wow. >> like having sex with mitch mcconnell. >> stephani
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
for joining us bright and early. another nsa spying bombshell. not only did they break thousands of laws while watching americans, but they claim they did it all by mistake. this is the scandal that keeps getting worse. we'll explain it. >> muslim groups planning a million muslim march set to take place on, get, this 9/11. why? because they say they are the real victims of that attack. >> clayton: take a look at this. a woman not doing any favor to her genders. repeated attempted to exit the garage. ms. al con camerota. it goes on for liar like a minute. she gets out. yeah. that's not going to work. does this prove that women can't drive? we're going to debate it next. "fox & friends" begins right now. hi. my name is alexandra, you are watching my favorite show. "fox & friends." >> alisyn: that's my daughter. >> is it really her favorite show? >> alisyn: it is her favorite show but i would never let her watch it. >> clayton: sounds like a character from the disney show. >> alisyn: i didn't know she recorded that my 8-year-old daughter is with us today she asleep at the moment. >> clayton: it's
of the problems with the nsa's talking points is that the nsa has, for a very long time, used word games, when it describes authorities publicly. those word games are based upon very strange and unordinary definitions the nsa assigned to some of the words that they use to defend their programs. >> in the "wall street journal's" report, the nsa does defend its practices. a spokeswoman says it's a very legal and respectful of americans' privacy. i she writes if americans communications are inadvertently collected during the process they use minimization procedures approved by the attorney general and used to protect the privacy of united states persons. you learned last week we did learn the nsa breached privacy rules and overstepped its authority thousands of times. >> new revelations. >> i wouldn't be surprised if people weren't watching us right now. >> i don't think anybody's watching. well, let's see, until sinbad gets out here who's in this building. >>> did you know a-rod was suspended by baseball for 211 games and said i'm lawyering up and by the time the appeal happens the season will b
putin. remember this image from back in june? say a little frosty you think between putin and obama? nsa leaker ed snowden has been granted asylum through vladmir putin in russia to remain there up through one year. it could be extended. perhaps after hanking out at the airport for a month 1/2. there are a lot of questions if a united states president and sit side by side with vladmir putin at a time when he granted american citizen, snowden asylum. that may not happen. at the same time the g20 summit will take place in st. petersburg, russia. we have all reason to think that will take place and there will be a moment where the president and vladmir putin will see each other and talk to each other and perhaps see a picture other than the one frozen in time. >> that will be interesting. bill: president obama speaking on the global terror threat for the first time to jay leno on late night. was the set after late-night talk show for the comments that have now closed 20 u.s. embassies? we'll debate that. >> the shooter questioning the victims. major nidal hasan with his opening statement th
. >> critics are refuting many claims the obama administration made by the nsa data collection program. that is leaving many worried about the security of their personal information and wondering whether or not the agency is playing by the rules. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge has more now from washington. hi, catherine. have we reach ad tipping. >> reporter: patti ann, according to aclu at least 20 pieces of legislation are being considered to modify the nsa program adding the white house continues to disappoint its base on the issue. >> i think the white house has lost credibility and i think the government generally has been operating with a deficit of trust in the area of surveillance for the past few years. they have been saying one thing publicly to congress and to the courts and turns out that quite another thing has been taking place behind closed doors. >> reporter: in the end the aclu alleges that the nsa plays word games under the set of rules known as the united states intelligence directive 18, collecting data only applies when the data is analyzed and
, if we're getting these constant reports out of the nsa that it went beyond just collecting over 115 million american phone records, to the latest news that is was every e-mail, every site folks went on so much information, so fast, they really couldn't even hold it that long because it was too massive to hold. that does raise the kind of concerns that senator paul has had, that chris christie seems to dismiss. >> but first of all, of course, we always need to be reviewing the scope of what the government is doing and whether it's justified, and that should be constant he reviewed. the problem is that the tactics the government uses to gather intelligence, the more public it is, eeasier for enemies to esaid it. so it's difficult to have an open debate. and there's so much misinformation in the press. i wouldn't dismiss these concerns offhand. if you're back home and you all of a sudden realize the government has the capable and is gathering information on every phone call made in america, you're concerned how that could be used not just by the government but by individuals working fo
begins a week-long family vacation. among the likely topics today, obamacare, the nsa, the terror threat overseas and our bumpy relationship with russia. joining me now for her take on what to expect today is monica crowley, fox news contributor. monica, always good to have you with us here on "happening now." the president, he is facing some questions today from the quote, unquote, news media as opposed to what he did the other night on tuesday with jay leno which is a softer approach. what do you think he is going to face today? >> actually jay leno asked him tougher questions. kelly: good for jay leno. >> sometimes than we see from the white house press corps, right? the president does in press conferences. he runs out the clock and take a question and tends to filibuster. i have a feeling this press conference lasts about an hour which is usually the time frame, he will run out the clock and run out the door to his vacation. i expect he will get a couple questions on nsa. for example he told jay leno earlier this week that the u.s. does not have a domestic spying program yet "the new
substantials and the n.s.a. and the i.r.s. and suddenly we get this alert that something could be happening in the arab world somewhere toward western interests, and it is pro-administration. we've heard this a million times. judge, i'm with you on this. it does look like -- >>gretchen: what if something huge does happen? i think we should keep our eye on the prize. >>steve: just that they would reveal such detail. they burned a source and a method, and that's the problem. they could still say be careful if you're in these areas. but to be so specific to make it look like the administration is working overtime, look at these fantastic avenues of intel, that is troubling. >> another scandal on a lesser scale the republican national committee is threatening to blackball nbc and cnn from the republican presidential debates if the networks don't scratch their pro-hillary clinton films. i mean, what kind of sense does this make for nbc and cbs -- >>gretchen: cnn. >> thank you. to be publishing films about hillary clinton. could you imagine if fox published one about mitt romney or george w. bush
of you know is against the nsa program. nsa, health care, immigration reform, it is all on the table for members of congress. what is your message to them? greensboro, n.c., what do you think? >> i am calling about the town hall -- caller: i am calling about the town hall meeting that was played just prior to ,washington journal" coming on and it looked like a representative was playing to the fears of the people in the audience. i am sure that he knew what they were saying, but he was just giving vague information. one person stood up and said that his -- he took his son to the hospital because his son was beaten by a dog and he talked to different people at the hospital and the comment was, get rid of the federal government. instead of the representative addressing his concern, it did not make sense. like anperson, look elderly gentleman, said he was in favor shutting down the government's. does he realize that he is receiving any kind of social security benefits or medicare that that would be shut down, too? the representative did not explain it to him. republicans just look like
in the -- matt here.matth ols olson is the current director of ct. nt foras been general counsel the nsa, acting assistant attorney general for national security, and special counsel to the fbi director. his predecessor at the end ctc -- the nctc is mike leiter. he was the second director of the national counterterrorism center until 2011. he is now senior counselor to the ceo of the data analytics alantir technologies. he is also a national security analyst for nbc news. why don't we begin with a very ,road question, and that is what is the current state of the threat from terrorism? where does it emanate from and how serious is it? why don't we start with you? >> it is great to be here. it is daunting to talk about it. we have talked about a lot of subjects today. i will give it a shot. i would say right off of the top the threat is very different now for what it was 10 years ago and even 4 years ago. thinking at a couple of different levels. as have been noted, the threat from al qaeda and afghanistan is really significantly degrading. we do not face the same rate as the same attack as 9/11.
the nsa a is not operating these microphones clearly. [laughter] or maybe barack obama is. that's a good point. it's wonderful to be here tonight. wonderful to be here at the steam boat institute. i think it's long past time that the aspen institute got a doze of truth and reality and facts. [applause] and we're thrilled to be part of that effort here tonight. we thought we would do a cup of things. we want to talk about current events, but the most important current event in our lives in our family has been the fact that my dad was bless -- we were all blessed. my dad was a recipient a of new heart a little over a year ago. [applause] and his story, you know, he talked about his first campaign for office when he was elected, and 1967, when i was running the first time was also the first time he had a heart attack, and i've been going back for reasons you can imagine looking at some old news clippings about political campaigns in wyoming, and came across one where my dad was asked about his heart attack in 1978. after he had the attack and decided he was going stay in the race he was int
it is fast and furious, whether it is benghazi, whether it is the n.s.a., you are never getting information. >>steve: some of the president's critics are saying the only reason we have heard about this particular terror threat at our embassies and diplomatic posts throughout the arab world is because in past administrations in the bush years, they never would have made such a big deal out of it. but right now the subtle message is, look, we were able to listen to this particular conversation between al-zawahiri and the guy who runs al qaeda in the arabian peninsula through the n.s.a. program so folks don't feel bad about the n.s.a. program. >> we'll wait and see what happens with this. if there is nothing that happens, we'll have to say you blew contacts, you blew sources and methods. was it to distract us from other issues. you know what makes me maddest of all? where's the media? when i was in the nixon administration, if the nixon administration had not turned over documents, you would have heard about it from every media source. they would have been screaming and crying. in this case th
temporary asylum to nsa leaker and american fugitive edward snowden. that's snowden leaving the airport where he had been holed up for more than a month. the move could derail a scheduled summit meeting between presidents obama and putin. cnn matthew chance following developments for us. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. that's right. absolute fury being expressed by officials in the wraits that russia has made this decision to grant edward snowden a political asylum for at least one year. he walked out of the airport. had been couped up for about a month. you see him walking with his lawyers into relative freedom of russia wra, though it's not clear just how free he will be. at the moment his location is being kept secret. his lawyers say that's because edward snowden himself fears for his own safety. he says he believes u.s. intelligence officers, because of the controversial nature of his position, are chasing him. we also understand from the lawyer of edward snowden as well, the russian lawyer, that is, that he will be living with american sit sfwlenz who are living in the ru
: we've got scandals to talk about. the n.s.a. at the very least looking at it. then you have the i.r.s., at the very least should we find out why the person heading up that program wants to take the fifth rather than talk. you have the benghazi attacks which ended up with four americans dead and an attack that lasted for hours in which they never got any help. you would think that is a scandal or something that should be examined and we should get some answers. the fact that some people want the answers, others say it is pursuing a partisan scandal. at least if you listened to jay carney yesterday. >>alisyn: we've been listening to the president the past week who has been inserting the phrase phony scandals into many of his speeches and we've been wondering which ones is he referring to. so yesterday jay carney, his press secretary, was asked that directly. amazingly, he included benghazi, which so many pundits said clearly they can't be calling benghazi a phony scandal. four americans are dead. but in fact he did include benghazi. listen to jay carney yesterday. >> we've seen time
broad new powers in 2008. "the washington post" made the analysis after getting documents from former n.s.a. analyst edward snoweden, now congress is getting involved. short time ago we talked with a reporter fouling this story. -- following this story. >> we are joined by jenifer martinez of the hill. why is judiciary committee chairman patrick leahy calling for another round of hearings on the n.s.a.? >> he's doing that in the wake of report that was published by "the washington post" late thursday, that n.s.a. had repeatedly broken privacy rules or overstepped its authority for years. soleil he came out today with -- so lie he came out with a statement today saying he remains concerned that congress is still not getting straightforward answers from the n.s.a., so he hopes to hold another hearing when congress returns to get these answers. >> how bad was this report that the "washington post" published on thursday? > it's definitely pret i damning. ust adds -- it would put the administration in even worse position than it was with the surveillance program. it also calls into question the
the nsa issue we have been facing in washington? guest: it is an interesting issue that concerns me. but it is interesting when i am home, i don't hear it much. small group ofa people. but when i am just at the coffee shop, that doesn't come up. up a lot.mes host: jake in fairhaven, massachusetts. independent line. lee terry. republican of nebraska. all her co-how is it going? -- caller: i was a going? i think the major deal as people think they should make a lot more money than they should. i think they should give a good cap scott two people working part-time -- tax cut for people working part-time jobs but not making a lot of money. get aple would want to part-time job or maybe not such a great job. i think that would put more money in their pocket. i notice when people get their tax returns and whatnot, they put all that money back into whatever -- buying a new tv or whatever. i think that would help the economy out. i talk to people and they think they should be making $20, $30 an hour because they think they deserve it. but really what i think it is, if they gave a good tax br
are warned of a terror threat. u.s. embassy a closed and al qaeda is to blame. >>> nsa leaker edward snowden who was holed up in that moscow airport since june is out. he's got a job offer and a new home. we're waiting to hear from the man accused of leaking those confidential u.s. documents. >>> the driver of that train that went off the rails in spain admits he was going twice the speed limit. welcome to "around the world." i'm suzanne malveaux. >> we missed you. i'm michael holmes. thanks for your c
peter king and other people from the intelligence community and the nsa and so forth, people are saying this is the most chatter that we've picked up since 9/1,1 actually since before 9/11. what does that mean? >> i think there are three points that need to be. one, clearly the presidential campaign of barack obama was false in saying that al qaeda was degraded two, the speech in may declaring the war on terror over was wrong. three, after benghazi, they don't want to keep the same mistake to keep americans in harm's way. four, as wes indicated, we've got good intelligence, but this is a tough, difficult business of engaging in this war on terror. the administration is taking the right kind of precautions. but we have to hold our breath and we have show we're not disengaged and that is a pattern that has to change with the u.s. government over the last couple years. >> peter brooks, is the government of pakistan or at least the secret service of pakistan giving al zawahiri all kinds of comfort and help and you think they're giving him resources for his campaign against the united states
for the reporting from cleveland. >>> nsa leaker edward snowden is free and any moment now may be speaking for the first time since russia dpragranted him a year-long asylum. apparently he's staying with some americans he met online and even has a job waiting for him if he wants it. phil black joins us live from moscow this morning. good morning, phil. >> good morning, chris. the job offer comes from a founder of a popular networking site often described as the russian version of facebook. the lawyer says he's surrounding himself by people he thinks he can trust, people who reached out to him online while stranded at the airport and he says they include american citizens. that man with his back to the camera is edward snowden and this was the moment he left moscow's airport after six weeks ther there. he's' according to his lawyer who is standing next to him in the photo. this document grants snowden permission to live in russia for one year which also keeps him beyond the reach of the united states for that time. ku kucharena describes his location as secret and safe. >> translator: he sa
. also on the show, general michael hayden, the former nsa and cia director, and an appearance by glenn downey, former executive editor of "the washington post." the sunday network tv talk shows are on c-span radio and brought to you as a public service by the networks and c-span. atin, rebroadcasts begin noon eastern with nbc's meet the week, 2:00, abc's this p.m., fox news sunday, 3:00, state of the union, and for clock p.m. eastern time, ace the nation from cbs. you can listen to them all on c- in thedio on 90.1 fm washington dc area. across the country, on xm satellite radio channel 119. -o online to c-span radio -- c spanradio.org. sort of anti-me suburb or person who thinks that everybody needs to live in new york city. i was very sensitive to coming across as an espresso-sipping, condo-dwelling elitist. that is not why i did this book. i understand why people like the suburbs. i get fed up with a lot of daily life in new york city. i was more drawn -- the trends were so undeniable, and the fact that there is a shift in the way suburban america is perceived by the people that live
to nsa leaker edward snowden. my next guest said it's the right direction but can't undo five years the president spent remaking the image into one perceived around the globe as weak. fox news contributor linda chavez. thanks for joining us this morning. >> great to be with you. >> i think a lot of people voted for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's e
snowden expose the nsa, now a government target. brand-new information in just overnight. >> and couch potato, bryan. >> yeah. this new gadget is for you. how you can watch tv without even sitting up. i want glasses where you can be on tv without -- >> that would be interesting. you'd be at home right now. >> i would be. what makes your family smile? backflips and cartwheels. love, warmth. here, try this. backflips and camm, ok!s. ching! i like the fact that there's lots of different tastes going on. mmmm! breakfast i'm very impressed. this is a great cereal! honey bunches of oats. i hear you crunching. ♪ ♪ (vo) purina cat chow. 50 years of feeding great relationship reinforced with scratch- resistant glass and a unibody made kevlar strong. okay google now. call my droid. the new droid ultra by motorola. when strength matters, droid does. everybody has different ideas, goals, appetite for risk. you can't say 'one size fits all'. it doesn't. that's crazy. we're all totally different. ishares core. find out why 9 out of 10your large professional investors choose ishares for their etf
which is the nsa who every three months is going to this fisa court which is a secret court which no one can appeal to. and they're getting warrants to get cell phone records basically every single american, okay? you have an fbi who believes that and has went to court to say that they do not, they don't need, basically they don't need a warrant to put a gps tracking device on your car. you've got an irs whose official position is that they don't need a warrant to check your e-mail. this, of course, is that same irs that has no compunction about using -- abusing their authority. they have targeted tea party groups and so far nobody has really paid a price for that. and so read the situation that i find, i think i'm and i might be the only person who feels it is about nothing is being done to rein in these government agencies. and so from my perspective it's like, well, the only privacy really have is what the government says that you have to. and i was really pumped when you voted against -- that was awesome, i was really happy about that. i was really disappointed that you voted against
nation's surveillance programs have helped thwart terrorist attacks because of the n.s.a. and f.b.i. personnel who work on these activities every day and working hard to comply with the law to protect our constitutional liberties and keep america safe. and contrast to the efforts of those hardworking, law-abidinging personnel, americans have serious reservations about attorney general holder and clapper who have -- who are ultimately responsible for the management of these programs. we remain gravely concerned about their lack to follow the law, be forthright with the american people and congress, and commitment to protect our actually guaranteed liberties. continued congressional oversight coupled with the terminations of clapper and holder will help restore these fight terrorism without compromising our liberties or creating gaps in our intelligence structure. in addition the removal may start the healing process to restore america's trust in our federal government. thank you, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from
. the president talking about the n.s.a. program that led to hearing the conference call. obama: i had the programs reviewed. we put in additional safeguards for congressional oversight and federal oversight that there notice spying on americans. >> well, hmm, that ship's kind of sailed. stephanie: ok, the president again. obama: another revelation showed that no government has abused any of these powers. stephanie: that's how they got to listen to the conference call, jim, go to jihad. don't you think this whole zimmerman trial and race in america is like an eye test now, is it better or worse, better or worse. >> one or two? one or two. stephanie: up or down. which way is it facing? are we facing backward or forwards? every story, president obama met in arizona by protestors singing bye-bye black sheep. even a sign in the crowd that said impeach the half white muslim. i guess they were mad at the white part. the half white and muslim part. >> and what would be the basis for impeachment? >> because he's black. what? what did i say? what? what? stephanie: this is in the section of the
every website every american goes to? must be the n.s.a. i attended a classified briefing, i can't go into anything there, but it appeared before the briefing very clear to me and i still feel this way, that when you blind yourself as to who the enemy is, as we have, purging all kinds of material from our f.b.i. training materials, state department, intelligence materials, as to who radical islamists really are and what they believe, you blind our law enforcement, our security people from the ability to see your enemy. we're not protected. when you have an open border where people are coming across at will and border patrolmen have told us three to four times faster than they ever have since we started talking about handing out legal status to anybody who happened to be here by a certain date, all this talk about amnesty, citizenship, all these other things, do they get benefits? not get benefits? all this talk has increased the number of people coming in by about three to five times. the border is not secure. when you don't control what kind of terrorists may be coming into your coun
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)